Two words: Memes and Literature

Memes. The images and or videos you engage with on a daily basis. Yes, some are humorous. However, memes hold more authority over us than you would initially assume. They define our experiences within this Digital Age in which we live. They spread easily, take on new forms and are constantly evolving, similar to a ‘virus’ (Brodie 2009).

Literature. Defined in many ways but typically described as written work with association to high-brow culture. The role of literature in society is changing as technology does, making this period of time incredibly interesting for us readers. From a graphic novel to a fable, to a poem to an autobiography. Literature too has various forms.

My research began with these two words in mind, memes and literature. Could memes be a modern form of literature in this Digital Age? 

My original question was broad and lacked in context. So, I have chosen to focus on the Digital Age because let’s face it, memes have existed since cavemen and the early stages of visual communication.

 tv sherlock sherlock holmes bbc sherlock research GIF

The sources I have uncovered are reliable and allow for various perspectives on these two words I find to be incredibly interesting, memes and literature. I want to hear your perspective of this newly discovered topic. I have created a survey for my stakeholders as I want to gather primary data to analyse. This will ultimately benefit my research project and add depth to my knowledge overall. This is the link to my survey https://goo.gl/forms/C1E435XjszG8YXNQ2 and I would appreciate your participation.

I intend to tweet regularly with updates regarding my project and its progress. Feel free to follow me @sophemacy to remain informed on this relationship between these two words, memes and literature. I will also blog detailed updates for my participants and stakeholders to read.

I welcome any suggestions, questions and or examples relative to this topic via my email sm918@uowmail.edu.au.

References:

  • Brodie, R 2009, Virus of the Mind: The New Science of Memes, Hay House Inc., 1st edn, pp. 4 -34.

GIF: Feel free to click on the image to be directed to the source

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